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May 20, 2014

AT&T Expanding Public Solar Charging Station Program in NYC



When Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast last year, there was a pouring out of friendly support for those struck hardest during the hurricane. One example of kindness could be seen by people who still had power setting up extension cords, allowing others to charge their phones. AT&T (News - Alert) saw an opportunity to help too during this time, and began setting up solar powered charging stations across New York. A year later, AT&T has decided, storm or no storm, that these charging stations are an excellent way to give to the community.

On May 18, AT&T announced that it will be putting more resources into their StreetCharge program, building even more solar powered charging stations across New York City. During the storm more than two dozen street stations were set up, and everyone is excited to see even more of them spread throughout the city. Even the local government seems excited about the initiative.

"As the warm weather approaches and New Yorkers take to the outdoors, they will be able to utilize the AT&T charging stations along with public WiFi (News - Alert) at many parks and beaches," says Robert Garafola, NYC Parks Deputy Commissioner for Management, Budget and Public Programs.

As part of the project, the stations have recently been upgraded to make them even more durable, standing up to weather and heavy usage. Each station consists of three solar panels that will store sunlight. The stored energy from the solar panels will allow the stations to charge mobile devices whether or not the sun is shining down on them. Residents will be able to use them on shady days, and even at night.

AT&T has stated that residents will be able to use the stations for free starting this week. Stations can be found in parks and other public places throughout all five city boroughs.

The charging stations show a commitment on AT&T's behalf to serving the community, and working towards more sustainable energy. If the program is successful, other cities may also find themselves with these solar powered stations, a sight that would likely be welcome by most.  




Edited by Maurice Nagle

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