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August 05, 2013

New Clean Diesel Tech Has Cost and Environmental Benefits



Whether you believe in global warming or not, the pollution caused by fossil fuels can't be denied. Factories, vehicles and power plants are some of the culprits responsible for this pollution, and it is responsible for the lives of millions of people around the world. Although diesel is seen as one of the dirtiest of fuels, new technology is making it more environmentally friendly. Using this new diesel as well as fuel-efficient heavy-duty diesel trucks has saved 13.3 million barrels and 560 million gallons nationwide from 2010 to 2012.

This new fuel is increasingly being accepted by manufacturers and consumers alike who are introducing and demanding passenger vehicles using diesel. A new report presented by the Diesel Technology Forum to the California Energy Commission (News - Alert) highlights many of the benefits.

Between 2005 and 2012, fuel savings in clean-air benefits has saved the state of California 2.5 million barrels of oil and 0.7 million tons of CO2. According to estimates by Allen Schaeffer, it will displace 165-240 million gallons of gasoline (2013-2020) in California if current trends continue with clean diesel.

"The importance of diesel technology to meeting California's climate and clean air goals is made possible by the inherent and proven energy efficiency of diesel, the transformation to clean diesel fuel and engine technology, and the significant penetration of diesel in key sectors of California's economy. As California policymakers evaluate future transportation fuels and technologies, this new research underscores the key role for clean diesel technology in saving energy and reducing CO2 emissions in both passenger cars and heavy duty applications," said Allen Schaeffer, executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum.

The benefit of this fuel is augmented by new generation diesel engines used in heavy-duty commercial trucks. With more than 20 percent of the new generation clean diesel commercial trucks, California is the largest proponent of this technology in the nation. Strict state and federal regulations since 2000 have transformed heavy-duty diesel trucks to near zero emissions state, and beginning in 2010, the same near zero emissions of nitrogen oxides has been achieved.

The new clean diesel heavy-duty trucks introduced from 2010-2012 account for 11 percent of all registrations, which has resulted in reducing fuel consumption by 3 to 4 percent. According to Exxon Mobil, this market is expected to supplant gasoline as the number one global transportation fuels by 2020, and the demand will account for 70 percent of the growth for all transportation fuels through 2040.




Edited by Alisen Downey

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