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March 25, 2013

Beijing Scholar Envisions an Expanded Macau as Global Hub for Eco-Technology



Despite its status as a Special Administrative Zone of China, Macau should not go its own separate way when it comes to addressing the threat of global warming, according to Professor C.S. Kiang, chairman of the Sustainable Development Technology Foundation and the founding dean of the College of Environmental Sciences at Peking University, a Beijing-based research institution.

Macau, along with Hong Kong, is one of China’s two Special Administration Zones. Under the policy of "one country, two systems," the Central People's Government is responsible for the zone’s defense and foreign affairs, while Macau maintains its own criminal justice system and currency, and customs and immigration policies.

But in a speech delivered last week at the 2013 Macau International Environmental Co-operation Forum & Exhibition (MIECF), Professor Kiang urged the administrative zone’s leadership to “think outside the box”—literally—or in this case, outside its borders.

According to the Macau Daily Times, the academic said that by joining with nearby Zhuhai and Hengqin, Macau could start a global hub for sustainable energy. Professor Kiang elaborated, “Instead of regional competition, we need to think of regional collaboration. Macau should not limit itself to the city. We should think of how to integrate the Pearl River Delta, and how to integrate it with Asia—and how Asia can integrate with the rest of the world.”

Indeed, Professor Kiang suggested that, as the eco-technology center of the world, the greater Macau- Zhuhai -Hengqin area would attract eco-tourism and cultural tourism.

“Macau has many casinos,” he said, “but casinos are not enough.”

Among the platforms Professor Kiang suggested would be advanced in the new eco-technology hub, is grid-tied distributed energy. He said, “I strongly recommend we establish an energy integration system that combines wind, solar, and other forms of energy technology, to create a one-stop shop for environmental technologies and pollution control.”

He also advised Macau to establish a development fund for investing in relevant projects, and a municipal data management center to collect and use relevant intelligence.

Finally, to drive the technology toward early adoption, Professor Kiang called for the creation of a “decision-making center” for urban and regional planning; “The most difficult thing about the development is, sometimes, the decision-making process….So the decision center is very important,” Professor Kiang stated.


Edited by Braden Becker

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